Wright, Gary - Child Of Light Lyrics




You came out from nowhere like the first star at night
And the world went on like it never saw you come
Your mother felt something and your father wasn't there
But she raised you best she could for a poor man's son

Shame, she never realized the light in your eyes
You're a child of light
You were born into a world that lives in darkness
You're a child of light
And you wear the thorn, anymore than man

As you grow old and wiser, you keep more to yourself
And when you are aware, your body glows
Keep a look to here, as you're walking through the night
They're hoping you might be the Holy Ghost

Do they ever understand the light in your eyes?
You're a child of light
You were born into a world that lives in darkness
You're a child of light
And you wear the thorn, anymore than man

Will they ever understand the light in your eyes?
You're a child of light
Being born into a world that lives in darkness
You're a child of light
And you wear the thorn, anymore than man
A child of light, child of light

Can't you see, child of light
That the world needs you tonight?





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Wright, Gary Child Of Light Comments
  1. Pete Reilich

    Drums: Jim Keltner
    Grand piano: David Foster
    Oberheim synthesizer (clarinet, brass, stings): David Foster
    Mini-Moog bass: Gary Wright
    String arrangement (conducted live strings): Pete Reilich

    Pete Reilich

    ><>><><<><>><><<><>><><<><>><><<

    Child of Light

    You came out from nowhere like the first star at night
    And the world went on like it never saw you come
    Your mother felt something and your father wasn't there
    But she raised you best she could for a poor man's son

    Shame, she never realized the light in your eyes
    You're a child of light
    You were born into a world that lives in darkness
    You're a child of light
    And you wear the thorn, being born a man

    As you grow old and wiser, you keep more to yourself
    And when you are aware, your body glows
    People look to ya, as you're walking through the night
    They're hoping you might be the Holy Ghost

    Do they ever understand the light in your eyes?
    You're a child of light
    You were born into a world that lives in darkness
    You're a child of light
    And you wear the thorn, being born a man

    (repeat Chorus)

    Can't you see, child of light
    That the world needs you tonight?

    Pete Reilich

    I often called my adoptive aunt Lee my "mother" which sometimes confused people. My birth mom was a very different character, a devoted farmer who despised Los Angeles so much after my dad brought her here, that one day she left us & we never heard from her again. I was age 18 months. Consequently, during babyhood I lived with my dad, who also was an odd character (estranged classical pianist). But he was stricken with cerebral cancer & died at hospital with the entire left side of his body paralyzed. I was age 5 years.

    My dad's sister, a local piano teacher in Studio City, seemed to be the only one willing to adopt me. But she had emotional issues & was particularly not fond of the rich. Like many frustrated musicians who become teachers, she considered American kids to be spoiled brats. Where she wasn't strict, she was certainly a critic personality & I felt the brunt of that throughout childhood. Especially in terms of how I looked quite a lot like my mother, who was a blonde beauty.

    Preferring to wear my hair long, which was the fashion then (1960s-70s), I was often mistaken for a girl & was carded at nightclubs, for example, well into my 40s, because I always looked much younger than I actually was. This may sound like a quality, and it was. But as a man, it became the basis for assuming that I was immature & narcissistic.

    During youth, I achieved in classical music & was enrolled, for example, on full scholarship to Interlochen Arts Academy, a high school for gifted kids, after producing my own audition tapes & materials without anyone's help. My most common memory of childhood & young adulthood, however is the one where people didn't trust that someone who looked like me was capable of achieving in serious music. Artists are, after all, a mostly pretentious, hyper-critical group. Pretty boys are looked upon as suspect charlatans, guilty of having no talent except their looks, until proven "innocent."

    It was always an uphill battle, sometimes ridiculously so, trying to prove myself as a worthy musical artist, particularly in the Jazz Fusion culture of Studio City, my hometown. Which is largely populated by musicians who see themselves as underdogs. For most session musicians in Hollywood's film industry are, actually not very respected. This is proven by the fact that we hardly ever see these instrumentalist's names in the movie credits. The same is true for classical musicians here, in terms of how the environment creates a different animal. In Hollywood, even the classical musicians run with the big dogs.

    I began to realize that fine art & other perfected productions is more about conformed behavior than anything else. In music business, personality is more important than the actual music (melody, harmony, rhythm). Everyone knows that about business, especially the pop-music culture. So the social games quickly become convoluted.

    For example, while we see reverse racism as a reactionary extension of America's melting pot influenced racism, we also see reverse attitude aimed at blaming/dismissing simplistic pop-music by criticizing elements that aren't "artistic" enough. Nobody wants to be the dumb blonde. The hustler is then rewarded for managing to come off as artistic within a commercialized art form which is actually quite incapable of recognizing subtle artistry. The art of lying well (bravado) reigns supreme.

    Dishonesty is common in the entertainment industry. The most respected men are the ones with pretty young women chasing after their prestige. While everyone else is supposed to bow to that prestige as well. But there also is always an artistic element to this nonsense. Of course then, the art here is hardly honest art. But rather is a cunning one which mirrors the conniving games that reap prestige. Which seems to make sense, since the terms "art" & "cunning" are synonyms. People in the industry regard this quotient as realistic "bottom line" mentality.

    The Angelino in New York City. . .
    "Where are you from?"
    "Hollywood."
    "Naw, naw. Nobody's from Hollywood."

    The game is to pull wool over the fact that the artistic culture is also a business and sometimes even more pretentious than its supposed overly simplistic counterpart in commercialized music & visual arts. Meanwhile, simple music (melody, harmony rhythm) is actually an important aspect even in the richest, most artistic music. In the end, the picture of music becomes distorted & basically amounts to a mess of pretentious nonsense vamping as important artistic opinion.

    Nowhere is this more true than in LA/Hollywood. Travelling back east, I wore the thorn of being from LA & therefore 1) was suspect of Hollywood pretensions (shallow mentality), or 2) was expected to add a Hollywood (dramatic, bravado) element to productions I worked on at school & in NYC. When I discovered that presumptions about my hometown had influenced by school scholarship, I found myself in the middle of controversy. Both hated & favored by issues which actually had nothing to do with me. Never simply seen for my true musical worth.

    Eventually, my innocent musical ambition/ideas changed into a hellish picture where it became clear that I was, despite several purely musical achievements starting as a young boy, hugely unqualified to succeed in both the art music world & the commercial music world because of a lack of proper integration into the social life of the music culture (system).

    "It's a means to an end, Pete." --Steve Porcaro, age 13

    Instinctively, I'd rejected "getting with the program." It was a shock when I realized how much more important non-musical things are to the music culture than actual music (melody, harmony, rhythm) are important for success. Still, I refused to join in the conformed games. I struggled in this state, losing my school scholarship and then finally dropping out of school completely. Subsequently, I took some hippie friends' offer to drive up to Topanga Canyon & join a commune. I didn't realize it at the time. But I had actually become estranged, like my father before me. Then I turned 17 years old. ... LoL

    Obviously, all of this was a curse which would have been easier, or non-existent if my father had not died & left me alone to fend for myself in a cruel, mistrusting, competitive world. Although I was usually respected by other musicians, I was also often a rival & consequently was viciously attacked by my detractors who would always claim that I was a "dumb blonde" and therefore not well suited for the arts and music business.

    Disillusioned with the world, I decided to go on tour with rock bands such as Gary Wright (age 18). But even there, the criticism of me increased. As a result of this combination of having an effeminate 'face' & also suffering from chronic sadness/loss of self-esteem from the fractured childhood, which caused me to have an extremely quiet personality, many often jumped to conclusions concerning my lack of character. A poor reputation in the biz ensued.

    Is it not surprising that most people will judge others before asking questions? This is especially true in the highly competitive music biz, where my qualities/achievements were always more suspect than rewarded.

    .... not that this lyric is about me, or anything like that . . . LoL

    You'd have to ask Gary what it's really about, since he's the one who wrote it. But to those of us who listen, it's probably safe to say that many of us interpret it to be about... some of us... how it seems to be something we relate to, how it reflects our experience.

  2. Pete Reilich

    @ hoknes thank you for posting

  3. Pete Reilich

    Gary was using Oberheim 4-voice polyphonic quite a lot when we produced this in late 1976 to early 1977. As he'd become linked to the nearby Santa Monica company & we used prototypes of their synthesizers in our live shows, the polyphonic ones having been the cutting edge of synth technology at the time.

    One of the difficulties of using the Oberheim polyphonic was keeping the multiple oscillators in tune, which was partly my job on stage before each show & sometimes during the show. As I played the cut-down Mini-Moog bass part in the band then & the Moog, having only two oscillators is much easier to keep in tune.

    During a break in the famous 1976 Frampton tours where we were usually the opening act (over 250 shows that year) the two of us, along with technician Alan Barclay, stayed at a hotel on the beach at West Palm Beach, Florida while Gary wrote material for the next album The Light of Smiles, from which this recording is one of the songs. I reflect very fondly on that experience, one of the nicest times of my life.

    Back in LA after the tours, we proceeded to record this album. David Foster, me & Jim Keltner were featured prominently on the slower songs such as this one, while Foster also played piano on the up-tempo songs (Are You Weeping & I'm Alright) with Art Wood on drums. Although I'm heard more playing Rhodes electric piano on Time Machine, Foster is all over this record.

    Here David is playing the piano and both of the main synthesizer parts. One of which is the distinct sound of an Oberheim with a flute-like sound patch & the other being an interlacing part played with a string sound patch, also on the Oberheim. All of these parts were improvised by David, and masterfully so, like composing a classical piece of music, part by improvised part, as they were successively overdubbed all in one session. Having Foster playing the keyboard string synth parts also carries an iconic aspect since he was the one who played the Arp String Ensemble parts two years before on Gary's biggest hit, Dreamweaver.

    I did, however have a small part of this record in the real string section that is heard toward the end of the song. A couple of small melodic lines/sustained notes which I arranged (notated) for a full string section to play.

    Pete Reilich

    --- Pete Reilich

    kathykay2010

    Pete Reilich Thanks for sharing your experiences about some of the
    details of making the music. I believe this album is some of the best
    music ever made. Making great music is a gift and great music is not

    made alone! Thanks for your contributions throughout the industry. I
    wish you and yours blessings and peace today, tomorrow & always...

  4. Dave Micklon

    Awesome Arp synth in the intro.

    Tarn Arn

    Dave Micklon AGREED!

  5. Wolfen567

    Takes  back to Camp Humphreys, Korea.  One  of the  few albums  we had access to over.

  6. Tom Markel

    My favorite Gary Wright album.

    Wolfen567

    Mine 2,  takes  me  back to Camp Humphreys, Korea.  US Army 1977  wow

    paul

    Mine too. This song is the best. Thanx Gary!

  7. leonakita

    he certainly is in my book

  8. bobby Jones

    I Love This L.P.!!!

  9. leonakita

    I love this album, a fine followup to his Dreamweaver breakthru album...and in many ways better... still fully committed to a synth dominated sound at this point , Wrights songwriting is at a peak. Unfortunately, an unsettled music market at the time dominated by disco and upstart punk made any continued realization of this glam synth kings dream, unreachable. This album fared poorly as did his subsequent releases, some justifiably so. But IMO this remains an outstanding LP.